Around Nyaung Shwe in Half a Day

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I spent my next day in Inle Lake area around Nyaung Shwe and decided to walk instead of renting a bicycle because I wanted to keep my hands free to shoot with my camera.  However, I wondered whether the free breakfast at the hotel, composed of three slices of small bread, butter and strawberry jam, papaya slices and tea, are enough to keep me going until lunch time.

I headed first to Shwe Yan Pyay Monastery, north of Nyaung Shwe and near the Shwenyaung junction (Nyaung Shwe and Shwenyaung? Really? Parang UP Ikot at Toki lang?). It’s just a straight path from the Mingalar market. The walk is pleasant because the road is covered with trees. It’s a main road where buses, bicycles, and even horse carts share the road.

Nyaung Shwe - Shwenyaung Road

Nyaung Shwe - Shwenyaung Road

Nyaung Shwe - Shwenyaung Road

Along Shwenyaung – Nyaung Shwe Road

A bus of elderly Westerners arrived just as I came to the monastery.  Shwe Yan Pyay Monastery is known for its oval-shaped windows.  I was not that lucky because the monastery was under renovation at that time and only one or two young monks are present to curiously watch the men working.  I think the monks are doing their activities at the other building beside the monastery, and I don’t think it is open to visitors.

Shwe Yan Pyay Monastery

Shwe Yan Pyay Monastery Shwe Yan Pyay Monastery Shwe Yan Pyay Monastery

Anyway, I managed to take a few shots of the oval shaped-windows and the empty, lonely interior.

Shwe Yan Pyay Monastery Shwe Yan Pyay Monastery Shwe Yan Pyay Monastery

Beside the monastery is a temple with numerous little Buddha statues.  Left alone with all these little Buddhas, I felt eerie, took a few shots and then left.

temple beside Shwe Yan Pyay Monastery

temple beside Shwe Yan Pyay Monastery temple beside Shwe Yan Pyay Monastery Heading back to Nyaung Shwe, I then went to the Museum of Shan Chiefs.  Admission fee is 2,000 kyats and photography is not allowed inside.  I was given a locker to leave my things and my shoes.  As a traditional practice, shoes are not allowed inside.

The museum, used to be a palace of the Royal family, is made of wood  and has four attached large apartments, each with a door opening out to the stone terrace.  Royal costumes and furnitures are also found inside.

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I would have wanted to visit the pagodas scattered around the Nyaung Shwe but didn’t have the time.  Hope to be back again someday 🙂

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