Inner and Outer Mandalay by Motorcycle (Part 1)

After an amazing experience in the temples of Bagan, Mandalay was my next stop, the 3rd leg of my 12-day trip to Myanmar.  Mandalay is the last royal capital of Myanmar (Burma).

From Bagan to Mandalay

I opted to go to Mandalay from Bagan by land trip, this time on a day trip (8:30 AM to 12:30 PM).  I booked for a bus trip through Green and Green Travel, which I encountered through Chengy Wong’s blog.  She provided an email address, I tried it and they replied quite fast considering the intermittent wifi connection in Myanmar.

They have a satellite office in Bagan and a representative came to my hotel while I was in Bagan to give me my ticket.  I expected for a bus ticket but it turned out to be a minibus, under the name of OK Express, for 9,000 kyats.

novice monks parade

We witnessed a novice monk parade while still in Bagan,aboard OK Express

So, was OK okay? Yes, the seats were comfortable, with complementary 500 ml mineral water bottle and a wet towel pack.  The only downside is that there were times I didn’t feel safe as our driver would sometimes overtake on curved paths, and forget to slow down while passing a sloping terrain.  The most okay thing about OK minibus is the door to door transport style.

on the way to Mandalay

Somewhere between Bagan and Mandalay. The trees along the road are refreshing.

We stopped by an eatery along the road, but I decided not to eat because I found every food was drenched in oil and I don’t like to trigger any untoward reaction in my stomach.  Even the snacks were fried stuff, one was a Shing-a-ling look-alike but again, drenched in oil.

Myanmar ox cart

Spotted an ox cart after I decided not to buy anything to eat at the “bus” stop

Outer Mandalay

I was initially confused on the terms Inner and Outer Mandalay, as well as Mandalay Region.  Mandalay Region covers Bagan, Naypyidaw, Amarapura, Inwa and Mandalay.  Inner Mandalay is Mandalay City, while Outer Mandalay refers to Inwa, Sagaing and Amarapura. But Bagan, though within the Mandalay Region, is not included in the Outer Mandalay because it belongs to Nyaung-U township rather than Mandalay township.  I don’t know why I’m explaining this, but I just wanted to tell that I spent a day exploring Outer Mandalay, and another day for Inner Mandalay.

I arranged for a motorcycle ride through my hotel, because this was the cheapest option for me that I know of.  And so I traveled to Outer Mandalay with my friendly motorcycle driver as my guide, habal-habal style as we call it in the Philippines.

First stop is the Mahamuni Buddha Temple, which is a large complex, and a revered pilgrimage destination in Myanmar next to Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon.  This is clear with the presence of many local devotees kneeling in front of the Buddha.  My guide told me that only men can come up the platform to rub golden leaves on the Buddha as an offering.  By the way, I paid a camera fee of 1,000 kyats.

Mahamuni Buddha Temple

A fortune teller stall on the way to Mahamuni Buddha Temple

Mahamuni Buddha Temple

Mahamuni Buddha Temple

Only men can enter the Buddha platform but a TV monitor is provided outside for devotees

Mahamuni Buddha Temple

Mahamuni Buddha Temple

Mahamuni Buddha Temple

A monk having a serious moment with his cellphone

We reached Sagaing 50 minutes after leaving the Mahamuni Buddha Temple.  To reach Sagaing, we crossed the Ayeyarwaddy River over a bridge.  Sagaing is visited for Sagaing Hill for its vista of Sagaing, the Irrawaddy River, and a couple of golden stupas surrounding the hills.

Irrawaddy River

View of Irrawaddy River from the bridge

The climb up the roofed path to Sagaing Hill took me around 20 minutes, with a few stops to take photos of the views on the way up.

Sagaing Hill

Stairs leading to the top of Sagaing Hill 

view up the Sagaing Hill

view up the Sagaing Hill

view up the Sagaing Hill

Views of scattered pagodas on the way up

Soon U Ponya Shin Pagoda

Soon U Ponya Shin Pagoda at the top of the hill

Sagaing Hill

I like the refreshing pastel colored tiles and fence at the top of the hill 

view from Sagaing Hill

 Sweeping view of Sagaing and Irrawaddy River

view from Sagaing Hill

Sagaing Hill

The mirror tiles give this place a fairy tale feel

food for Buddha

Food offered to the Buddha – I wonder where this end up after

Forty five minutes away from Sagaing Hill is Mingun.  The road from Sagaing to Mingun is mostly without any shade at all, so traveling on a motorcycle under the scorching heat gave me no choice as the sun looked down on me with its scorching heat.

Mingun boasts of Hsinbyume Pagoda, an all-white pagoda located on the banks of Irrawaddy River.  I don’t know why but the temple reminded me of the movie, Narnia.

Hsinbyume Pagoda, Mingun

Hsinbyume Pagoda, MingunHsinbyume Pagoda, Mingun

Some walking distance from the Hsinbyume Pagoda is the Mingun Bell, the second largest bell in the world and was supposed to be dedicated to the nearby Mingun Pahtodawgyi Pagoda, which was never completed and now in ruins.

Mingun Pagoda

Mingun Pagoda

Mingun Pagoda

The massive Mingun Pahtodawgyi Pagoda is like a giant version of the small temples of Bagan.  It would have been the largest pagoda in Myanmar but the construction was put to a slow by the King due to a prophecy which foretold that the king would die once the stupa is finished.  The prophecy turned out to be untrue because the king died before the completion of the construction.  The construction was completely halted after the King died.  However, some sources point out that the construction may have been slowed down due to lack of funds, lack of labor after the slaves escaped and engineering difficulties.

Nineteen years after the construction stopped, an earthquake caused cracks in the stupa.  Now, isn’t that story a good material for an epic book or movie?

Mingun Pagoda

These days, visitors climb up the right side of the pagoda using a stairway, even though a large red sign tells visitors not to climb up for security reasons.  I saw both tourists and locals go up, and so I went by the logic that “if others can, why can’t I?”

Mingun Pagoda

incense sticks at Mingun Pagoda

Incense sticks inserted on the crevices of the giant stupa’s bricks

As with any other stupas in Myanmar, the practice is to remove the shoes when entering pagodas.  I have to remove my slippers to go up the stairs that had sunbathed to the highest level under the 12 noon sun.  The top gave me a magnificent view of the Hsinbyume Pagoda, the Irrawaddy River and the mountains on the other side of the pagoda.  Much as I would like to appreciate the views for a longer while, I could not do so because the sole of my feet is already at the verge of blistering.

Hsinbyume Pagoda, Mingun

Hsinbyume Pagoda as seen at the top of Mingun Pagoda

Mingun Pagoda

This young guy managed to smile amidst the scorching hot floor 

Mingun Pagoda

Local products for sale at the foot of Mingun Pagoda

Chinthe lion

This structure of giant Chinthe lion guarding the large stupa stands (or rather, is supposed to stand) opposite the Mingun Pagoda, facing the river.  It was also in ruins after the earthquake.

_DSC7033    monk puppet

I can’t imagine a puppet monk hanging in my room

After lunch at Mingun, we proceeded to Inwa (formerly Ava), which was once also the capital of Burma, but unfortunately devastated by a series of earthquakes.  I instantly liked Inwa because of its lush, green surroundings and laid back atmosphere.  Entering Inwa is like taking a trip back in time.  The roads are covered with thick canopies from side to side, with horse carts in sight.

Inwa, Myanmar

Inwa, Myanmar

_DSC7087

Being once a capital, it also had a lot of stupas scattered around the small area, but most are in ruins due to the earthquake in 1839.

Le Htat Gyi Pagoda, Inwa

Le Htat Gyi Pagoda – it now lays in ruins but it must have been a magnificent structure in the past

Le Htat Gyi Pagoda, Inwa

Intricate carvings of Le Htat Gyi Pagoda

Khoe Thin Kyaung Pagoda Complex

Khoe Thin Kyaung Pagoda Complex – some portions are crumbled by the earthquake

Yadana Hsemee Pagoda Complex

Yadana Hsemee Pagoda Complex

Yadana Hsemee Pagoda Complex

The Maha Aung Mye Bon Zan Monastery is a unique monastery in that it has a traditional teak monastery look with multiple roofs but instead of wood, it is made of bricks

Maha Aung Mye Bon Zan Monastery

Maha Aung Mye Bon Zan Monastery

Maha Aung Mye Bon Zan Monastery

Close to the brick monastery is the Bagaya Monastery, a traditional monastery built of teak tree trunks as pillars.  Pictures of this monastery I have seen before my trip had me so impressed so I especially made sure that this place will be part of our Inwa itinerary.  I was not disappointed as I saw the beautiful intricate carvings of the monastery.  The only thing let down for me is that at the time of my visit, the monastery was empty of monks, except for the lone monk I saw reading through the window light and a sleeping dog which I almost tripped upon.

Bagaya Monastery

Bagaya Monastery

Bagaya Monastery

Bagaya Monastery

Bagaya Monastery

Inwa horsecarts

A row of horsecarts outside the monastery, catering to tourists

After the laid back atmosphere in Inwa, here I am at the U Bein Bridge, where all tourists have converged just before the sunset.  I didn’t expect it to be this crowded but anyway, my time at the U Bein Bridge both on it and under, had been the most interesting people-watching moment I had in my life.

A lot is going on around this bridge:  locals crossing while carrying something above their head, local and foreign tourists taking their selfies everywhere, people sitting and just hanging out on the footbridge, vendors along and near the bridge, monks crossing, traditional boats crossing under, fishermen catching fish using a unique method, and photographers aiming and shooting about.

U-Bein Bridge, Amarapura

U-Bein Bridge, Amarapura

U-Bein Bridge, Amarapura

U-Bein Bridge, Amarapura

U-Bein Bridge, Amarapura

_DSC7144

U-Bein Bridge, Amarapura

Photography service in Luneta-like fashion 

U-Bein Bridge, Amarapura

U-Bein Bridge, Amarapura

U-Bein Bridge, Amarapura

No other prawn crackers or fish crackers can beat the freshness of these fried seafood snacks

U-Bein Bridge, Amarapura  U-Bein Bridge, AmarapuraU-Bein Bridge, AmarapuraU-Bein Bridge, Amarapura

U-Bein Bridge, Amarapura

U-Bein Bridge, Amarapura

U-Bein Bridge, Amarapura

That covers my one day exploration of “Outer Mandalay”.  It’s a little bit of everything from each town of Sagaing, Inwa and Amarapura, but with my limited time in Mandalay, the trip is definitely worth it.  It would be nice to go back in another time, and concentrate on each area because there are so much to see in these places.

I’ll tell you more of “Inner Mandalay” on my next blog.

 

Traveled March 2015

2 thoughts on “Inner and Outer Mandalay by Motorcycle (Part 1)

  1. Pingback: Life in Inle Lake - Finding Jing

  2. Pingback: Inner and Outer Mandalay by Motorcycle (Part 2) - Finding Jing

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: